Congressional Research Service. December 17, 2013.

Nanotechnology—a term encompassing the science, engineering, and applications of submicron materials—involves the harnessing of unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanoscale substances in fundamentally new and useful ways. The economic and societal promise of nanotechnology has led to investments by governments and companies around the world. In 2000, the United States launched the world’s first national nanotechnology program. From FY2001 through FY2013, the federal government invested approximately $17.9 billion in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology through the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). President Obama has requested $1.7 billion in NNI funding for FY2014. U.S. companies and state governments have invested billions more. The United States has, in the view of many experts, emerged as a global leader in nanotechnology, though the competition for global leadership is intensifying as countries and companies around the world increase their investments.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34401.pdf [PDF format, 69 pages].

Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

On December 20, 2013, in Science & Technology, by editor1

Congressional Research Service. December 16, 2013.

Congress continues to demonstrate interest in and support for nanotechnology due to what many believe is its extraordinary potential for delivering economic growth, high-wage jobs, and other societal benefits to the nation. To date, the Science and Technology Committee in the House and Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation have directed their attention primarily to three topics that may affect the United States’ realization of this hoped for potential: federal research and development (R&D) investments under the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI); U.S. international competitiveness; and environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns. This report provides a brief overview of these topics and two other subjects of interest to Congress: nanomanufacturing and public attitudes toward, and understanding of, nanotechnology.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34511.pdf [PDF format, 17 pages].

Congressional Research Service. May 22, 2012.

Nanotechnology–a term encompassing the science, engineering, and applications of submicron materials–involves the harnessing of unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanoscale substances in fundamentally new and useful ways. The economic and societal promise of nanotechnology has led to substantial and sustained investments by governments and companies around the world. In 2000, the U.S. launched the world’s first national nanotechnology program. From FY2001 through FY2012, the federal government invested approximately $15.6 billion in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology through the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). President Obama has requested $1.8 billion in NNI funding for FY2013. U.S. companies and state governments have invested billions more. As a result of this focus and these investments, the U.S. has, in the view of many experts, emerged as a global leader in nanotechnology. However, the competition for global leadership in nanotechnology is intensifying as countries and companies around the world increase their investments.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34401.pdf [PDF format, 60 pages].

Nanotechnology: A Policy Primer

On April 19, 2012, in Economy, Science & Technology, by editor1

Congressional Research Service. April 13, 2012. 

Nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, commonly referred to collectively as nanotechnology, is believed by many to offer extraordinary economic and societal benefits. Congress has demonstrated continuing support for nanotechnology and has directed its attention primarily to three topics that may affect the realization of this hoped for potential: federal research and development (R&D) in nanotechnology; U.S. competitiveness; and environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns. This report provides an overview of these topics and of two others: nanomanufacturing and public understanding of and attitudes toward nanotechnology.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34511.pdf [PDF format, 17 pages].