Pew Research Internet Project. March 13, 2014.

The digital era has brought profound challenges and opportunities to countless institutions and industries, from universities to newspapers to the music industry, in ways both large and small. Institutions that were previously identified with printed material, and its attendant properties of being expensive, scarce, and obscure, are now considering how to take on new roles as purveyors of information, connections, and entertainment, using the latest formats and technologies. The impact of digital technologies on public libraries is particularly interesting because libraries serve so many people (about half of all Americans ages 16 and older used a public library in some form in the past year, as of September 2013) and correspondingly try to meet a wide variety of needs. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2014/03/PIP-Library-Typology-Report.pdf [PDF format, 131 pages].

Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. January 22, 2014.

The internet has already had a major impact on how people find and access information, and now the rising popularity of e-books is helping tranform Americans’ reading habits. In this changing landscape, public libraries are trying to adjust their services to these new realities while still serving the needs of patrons who rely on more traditional resources. This report finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/files/legacy-pdf/PIP_Library%20services_Report.pdf [PDF format, 80 pages].

Pew Research Center. January 16, 2014.

The percentage of adults who read an e-book in the past year has risen to 28%, up from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same time, about seven in ten Americans reported reading a book in print, up four percentage points after a slight dip in 2012, and 14% of adults listened to an audiobook. Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits. Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are “e-book only.” Audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits overall, while fewer print readers consume books in other formats. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2014/PIP_E-reading_011614.pdf [PDF format, 20 pages].

American Library Association. April 18, 2013.

Libraries and library staff continue to respond to the needs of their communities, providing key resources as budgets are reduced, speaking out forcefully against book banning attempts and advocating for free access to digital content in libraries, with a keen focus placed on ebook formats. These and other library trends of the past year are detailed in the report. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.ala.org/news/sites/ala.org.news/files/content/2013-State-of-Americas-Libraries-Report.pdf [PDF format, 83 pages].

Teens and Technology 2013

On March 29, 2013, in Science & Technology, by editor1

Pew Internet & American Life Project. March 13, 2013.

Smartphone adoption among American teens has increased substantially and mobile access to the internet is pervasive. One in four teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer. In overall internet use, youth ages 12-17 who are living in lower-income and lower-education households are still somewhat less likely to use the internet in any capacity — mobile or wired. However, those who fall into lower socioeconomic groups are just as likely and in some cases more likely than those living in higher income and more highly educated households to use their cell phone as a primary point of access. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_TeensandTechnology2013.pdf [PDF format, 19 pages].