The Brookings Institution. June 27, 2013.

On June 27, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings hosted General Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for keynote remarks and a discussion of the military’s role in cyberspace and the threat that cyberattacks pose to the U.S.

http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/events/2013/6/27%20cybersecurity%20dempsey/20130627_dempsey_cybersecurity_transcript [PDF format, 43 pages].

 Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper presents the U.S. Intelligence Community’s 2013 Worldwide Threat Assessment Statement for Record before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, March 12, 2013.

“The Intelligence Community is committed every day to providing the nuanced, multidisciplinary intelligence that policymakers, diplomats, warfighters, and international and domestic law enforcement need to protect American lives and America’s interests anywhere in the world.”

http://www.dni.gov/files/documents/Intelligence%20Reports/2013%20ATA%20SFR%20for%20SSCI%2012%20Mar%202013.pdf [PDF format, 34 pages].

Center for Strategic and International Studies. February 8, 2013.

This report looks at the political-military aspects of cybersecurity and attempts to place it in the larger context of international security. Cybersecurity has been an issue for national security since the 1990s, but the U.S. response has been ad hoc and reactive, marked by uncertainty over how to deal with a major new problem for international security. This report identifies six principles that should guide the United States in developing a strategic approach. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://csis.org/files/publication/130208_Lewis_ConflictCyberspace_Web.pdf [PDF format, 70 pages].

Congressional Research Service. November 9, 2012. 

For more than a decade, various experts have expressed increasing concerns about cybersecurity, in light of the growing frequency, impact, and sophistication of attacks on information systems in the United States and abroad. Consensus has also been building that the current legislative framework for cybersecurity might need to be revised. The complex federal role in cybersecurity involves both securing federal systems and assisting in protecting nonfederal systems. Under current law, all federal agencies have cybersecurity responsibilities relating to their own systems, and many have sector-specific responsibilities for critical infrastructure. 

http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/201043.pdf [PDF format, 66 pages].

Securing U.S. Cyberspace

On February 28, 2012, in Defense, Foreign Policy, Terrorism, by editor3

Council on Foreign Relations. February 22, 2012.

In January 2012, FBI Director Robert Mueller testified that the cyber threat to the United States is expected to eclipse the threat of terrorism in the coming years. Though the country has avoided a cyber “Pearl Harbor” to date, a steady stream of significant cyber attacks, particularly by foreign sources conducting major acts of espionage, indicate the nation’s ongoing vulnerability, say some analysts. Safeguarding digital networks has been a priority of Washington for several years, but thus far the federal government has not mandated minimum levels of cybersecurity for private operators of critical information systems. Bipartisan legislation introduced in the U.S. Senate this month proposes new standards for the protection of critical infrastructure and enhancing sharing of threat information between government and private industry. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.cfr.org/united-states/securing-us-cyberspace/p27430 [HTML format].